Where are they now?  Cruising Tips and Advice  Newsflash - Latest Pardey news  Lin & Larry bios  Browse and buy Pardey Books!  Browse and buy Pardey Videos  Checkout  Home Page
 

  2009
February
March
April
June
August
September
October

2008
January
March
May
June
September
October
December

2007
January
March
April
June
August
October
November
December

2006
January
March
May
June
August
September
November
December

2005
January
March
April
June
August
October
December

2004
March
June
August
September
October
November
December

2003
January
March
April
June
July
August
October
November
December

2002
January
February
March
May
June
August
October
November
December

2001
January
March
May
August
October
December

2000
January
February
March
May
July
September
November

1999
July
August
October
December


Browse a category

August 2006
Dear Friends:

Sometimes magic happens. Everything goes to plan, or better yet, what wasn't planned is better than what we might have planned. The Mahurangi Cruising Club, North Cove regatta was wonderful. The weather predictions had been pretty good, the actual weather that arrived was even better. Festivities seemed to blast off on Friday with the arrival of over a dozen classic yachts, a house load of visitors and a barbeque at Jo and Steve Horsley's house at the eastern side of the bay. A pile of freshly caught fish, provided by arriving sailors and barbequed by Dean, a professional chef, sent wonderful aromas wafting through the crowd all evening.

Regatta day, we used our barge as a landing for dinghies

Early Saturday morning, Gabriel Wilson from directly across the bay, arrived with a bag full of silky hand sewn signal flags to string the length of our jetty. Larry and Doug disappeared to return with a neighbors gas fired barbeque, Anya came rowing in with a huge box of sausages, onions and bread and the fun was on. All morning long, visiting sailors and neighbors took turns sailing some of the dozen radio controlled yachts off the end of our jetty, while Gabriel recorded who won each of the twenty minute long races. Sizzling sausages kept kids and adults alike from starving, and then at noon there was a very joncular race meeting to determine the course and start times for the full sized yachts race.

The regular dinghy pontoon served as a base for controlling electric sailing models

Hugh Gladwell, who is the official handicapper for the club, had a real challenge when 20 yachts were entered, ranging from an open cockpit Haven 11 ½ footer to a full out 60 foot race boat (Northerner, built in the 1950's), from lightweight modern boats to 111 year old Thelma. We were each given a starting time, with the hopes that we would all finish together. In New Zealand this is called a Mark Fowey start; others know this as a staggered start. The idea is that at the end of the race, no one has to wait for a handicapper to decide who won; first boat across the line is the winner. We crossed the starting line on Thelma 30 minutes after the first boat, Doug and Helen Schmuck adding the extra crew power for a 10 mile race with winds ranging from 5 knots to 25, and seas from dead flat to steep eight foot swells. We had a grand race, passing half a dozen of the early starters, keeping our place well ahead of those bigger boats who were charging up astern of us. But it was the finish that was the best surprise of all. As we approached the reef that marks the entrance to North Cove we were tied in dead heat with five other boats. All of us tried to outmaneuver each other during the last light air beat past the reef marker. I was shocked when Larry tried to gain a better position by tacking within five feet of the kelp covered rocks. There was no finishing boat to shoot off a gun, but by everyone's estimate, the first six boats finished within one minute of each other. Every boat finished within five minutes for some of the closest handicappings we have ever seen.


Thelma is on her mooring waiting for her chance to race

The barbeque on our terrace that night was highlighted with a computer display of grand photos taken by Micheal Marris from his powerboat. After the prize giving for each of the days events, the banter was all about the handicapping, plus plans for next years autumn regatta. The assumption by all that attended was that it will once again be held on our jetty and terrace. This shows us how hard it is becoming to maintain two separate lives, but also how rewarding. But by the time everyone departed two days later we were looking at our calendar to see if our long term sailing plans and favorite New Zealand regattas could all be worked in together.

Hugh Gladwell, Mahurangi Cruising Club handicapper is laying down the law, the course and our starting time.

With winter fast approaching, we had already booked flights to the USA when Larry said, "I'm not ready to leave, we haven't finished enjoying the summer." I couldn't disagree that summer seemed to be lingering as we enjoyed some afternoon excursions on Thelma. But I was also excited about getting to the US not only to rejoin lovely Taleisin, but also because we had arranged to attend Book Expo America which was being held in Washington D.C. with an eye to introducing our new edition of Care and feeding. Fortunately, four days before our intended departure, the weather turned with a vengeance. Cold temperatures, strong wind and rain heralded the middle of May and made us less reluctant to leave.

The crew of Sorceress definitely had a good time, with Finnbar the dog firmly in control

We have favorite friends in the Annapolis area from our days of cruising on the Chesapeake. Denise and Lars Lindenhall treat us like family when ever we are in that area, so our stay in Washington D.C. was a double delight. The Book fair is an amazing event. As we wandered past 2500 booths looking at the amazing array of books that are published each year, we never knew who we might end up meeting - editors we have worked with through the years, famous authors, other sailors. One minute I was getting an autographed copy of a book by the ex-secretary of the state, the next I was listening to Sebastian Junger (of Perfect Storm fame). Every publisher was putting on promotional events trying to get their newest books noticed; free copies of books were being handed out like lollypops. We left there with enough new reading material to fill the summer, plus a ton of new information on how the internet is affecting what folks like to read. Best news of all gained from several hours with well informed representatives of Google, Amazon and two other major books on line players is…hard copy books are here to stay. After ten years of trying to promote e-books, less than 1 percent of books published today are available in down-loadable formats - seems folks still like the feel of a nicely bound book. E-book demand is mostly for instructional manuals and books containing info that can change drastically in a short time.

This is Thelma's big sister Waioni and winner of the big boat fleet.

Our east coast jaunt was a short one, but we did take the time to drive down to Virginia's Northern Neck to revisit one of our favorite haunts, the little boatyard on the Yeocomico where Taleisin spent two winters. Marion and Doug, who run Krentz Marine, greeted us like long lost friends and displayed the same warm exuberance that made our time on this quiet back water special. Our visit there made me look back through our cruising years and recall that our best times seemed to be when we sailed across and ocean, arrived in a place where there were lots of inlets, islands and anchorages to explore, found a central base to sail from, then spent weeks and months exploring the outer reaches and returning to the familiarity of home base - La Paz in Baja California, Brachuy in Brazils, Isla Grande area, Punta Arenas in Costa Rica.

And here is our other love, Thelma, beating toward a four place finish, 20 seconds behind the first place finisher.

With our book launched, we got back to California, picked up our 1986 Ford truck and camper from its place in the middle of a vineyard in Paso Robles and headed north to see how Taleisin had fared over the winter. What we found was far more pleasant than we expected a boat in almost prefect order and a unique reunion which we'll tell you about in our next newsletter.

Fair winds,

Lin and Larry

 

 






Pardey Mailing List
Get email notice of all Pardey updates!
 Email  
To unsubscribe: use the link at the bottom of our mailings or email unsubscribe@landlpardey.com
Back to Top
Contact Information | Search |Where Are They? | Cruising Tips | Books | Videos
 

- Paracay.com links -
Contact Information | Search |Cart Contents | Checkout | Shipping Details
© 2009 Lin & Larry Pardey and Paradise Cay Publications, Inc.